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We hope you all enjoyed Scala in the City at Springer Nature

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Thank you so much to everyone who came along to Scala in the City last night at Springer Nature.

We got the best introduction to how Springer Nature came about from Head of Development, Ben Kirkley so thank you to the Springer Nature team for welcoming us into their office. We hope you're enjoying getting an insight into the different companies hosting Scala in the City!

Our speakers, Xiayun Sun and Adam Warski were spectacular and we are so grateful to them both for making the journey out to teach us their knowledge. If you didn't get the chance to make it along then not to worry, as usual, we will have the videos from each of the talks ready for you to watch next week. 

Make sure to stay posted for the announcement of next months Scala in the City, we're very excited about this host! You can sign up to our meetup page to stay in the know here. 

Can't quite wait that long?

Catch up on Xiayun Sun's slides below.

You can check out the code from Adam's talk here.

 

Automatic differentiation in Scala

Most modern deep learning methods rely on gradient descent during training, where the gradient is usually calculated for a complex chain of operations. It turns out there is a generic method to derive this gradient, achieving "automatic differentiation", and functional language like Scala is well suited for this task.

In this talk I will explain what automatic differentiation is, how to model it in Scala.