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Orthogonal Functional Architecture By John De Goes

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If you are interested in how to make functional code orthogonal then this presentation by John De Goes is perfect for you. Presented at Lambda Squared, the single day single track functional programming conference held in Knoxville, he discusses 'Orthogonal Functional Architecture' and introduces orthogonality and composability, as well as showing you how to make functional code orthogonal.


John De Goes goes into further detail below.

"Well-architected libraries for functional programming are at once immensely beautiful and practical. They are simple but extraordinarily powerful, helping users solve their problems by snapping together Lego-like building blocks, each of which has just one purpose. Yet, there is a surprising dearth of material on how developers can construct their own well-architected functional code. Many functional programming tutorials talk discuss type safety and making illegal states unrepresentable, but few speak on the subject of good functional interface design. 
In this presentation, John A. De Goes takes to the stage to discuss a nebulous and underrated tool in the arsenal of every functional programmer. Called *orthogonality*, this tool allows programmers to craft the building blocks of their functional code at "right angles", so so they can be reasoned about simply and composed predictably to solve complex problems. John introduces the concept of orthogonality, looking at its geometric and algebraic origins, presents a way to measure orthogonality, and then walks through a number of interface examples, comparing non-orthogonal designs with orthogonal ones. 
By the end of the session, attendees should have a newfound appreciation for how important orthogonality is to constructing good functional interfaces, and they should develop the early stages of an intuition about how to slice up a complex problem into core, single-purpose, composable building blocks."